TUSITALA OF THE SOUTH SEAS by Joseph W. Ellison

TUSITALA OF THE SOUTH SEAS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This record of R. L. Stevenson's South Seas odyssey contains all the delight of the romantic reality which was the essence of the author and his later life. Stevenson's affinity for the sea, his quicksilver temperament, his charm, his sense of justice, his warmth and gaiety, his self esteem are conveyed through his deeds, conversations, letters. To the Marquesans, the Hawaiians, the Tahitians, the Gilbertese, and most of all to the Samoans among whom he settled, Stevenson was known and loved as Tusitala, the teller of tales. Taking the troubles of his Samcan friends to heart, Stevenson became involved in the three-power struggle for Samoa, backed Mataafa in his unsuccessful revolt, and wrote numerous letters on the Samoan situation to the London Times and Pall Mall Gazette. The responsive devotion of the natives was evidenced by the Road of the Loving Heart which they hacked out of the forest to Vailima, his isolated ""flash-house"" where he wrote, entertained, and died. Stevenson's life at Vailima, his encounters and friendships with the natives, his writing, moreover the native life itself are treated with warmth and facility. The book has the dual charm of the romance of the literary Scotchman and that of remote places and lives.

Publisher: Hastings House