EACH DAY'S PROUD BATTLE by Josephine Winn

EACH DAY'S PROUD BATTLE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The 7th selection in this first books program is a soberer type of work than some of the previous, is American in background and is involved with loyalties and integrities. The Great Lakes town of Pokana stems from several families but the Tureks are prime movers in its prosperity, and when Jerome's manipulations of utilities system stocks come to light through the suicide of his head accountant, the resulting trial reflects on his wife and son, Monroe. Dying, without ever telling the truth that will hurt Lavinia's love for her father, Jerome leaves their son with the obligation to carry on his desire to pay back all that have been hurt in the debacle. Monroe dedicates his life to restore his father's name and, at the expense of public opinion, carries on in his own way. He knows the love of three women, he is never able to persuade his mother to join him in the necessary repayment (Lavinia prefers to bring Pokana to its knees socially), he does convince others to contribute to his struggles to do what his father did not live to do, and his death, which brings guilt to his son George, is the means of winning Lavinia to help George in discharging the family obligation. Almost a quarter century span embraces a place and its people in believable fashion but the argument and the story are often too bulkily assembled for complete compatibility.

Pub Date: March 13th, 1960
Publisher: Putnam-The New Authors Guild