THE BLACK BOOK OF HUNGER by Josue de Castro

THE BLACK BOOK OF HUNGER

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

In 1952, Josue de Castro surveyed The Geography of Hunger and what could be done about it in a book of that name. Today, with four years as president of the FAO behind him, he forcibly explains the danger and prospects of a world divided between ""those who do not eat and those who do not sleep."" De Castro sees hunger at the base of war and revolution, and an increasingly yawning disparity between the fortunes of the industrial and underdeveloped nations, as raw products mainly remain stable, industrial goods spiral. ""Hunger will be conquered only by development."" To combat hunger, the World Association for the Struggle against Hunger, ASCOFAM, with its subsidiary agencies, IRAM and IRFED, and the International Center for Development have been conceived. They are intended to cut across barriers of communism and capitalism and breach the poverty of the ""Third World."" The author discusses their aims and means fully, probes too the problems of capital trade. Appendices take up the Freedom from Hunger Campaign, proteins for Latin America--in a study of Brazil, a plan for the third world. Determined and engaged, Josue de Castro here introduces the reader to an important, ambitious social program, global in scope. Concern and involvement is implied, some attention is assured.

Publisher: Funk & Wagnalls