THE GEOGRAPHY OF HUNGER by Josue de Castro
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THE GEOGRAPHY OF HUNGER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

As a diligent Brazilian scientist and an active member of the F. A. O., Josue de Castro has made a rather brilliant resume of his work in the writing of this book and a substantial contribution to the annals of social study. In the main, it is a study of the world's hunger problems- how they affect social and individual temperament and what to do for amelioration. Through extensive descriptions and analyses of specific hungers-by country and for certain nutritional elements- economic, cultural and geographical conditions that cause hunger; of historical backgrounds of hunger conditions, de Castro's contentions are that hunger is the most evil of war's causes; it is not a natural phenomenon but in turn caused by economic mismanagement; the old and neo-Malthusian principles rest on unscientific foundations; overpopulation is caused by malnutrition's impetus to human fecundity. Intelligently, he advocates high level production, reduction of trade restrictions, government and private capital investments in under-privileged areas, restoration of convertible currencies. Although somewhat at fault in overestimating hunger and nutrition as cultural and personality determinants, the book is a healthily hopeful, fascinating and well organized viewpoint of one world.

Pub Date: Feb. 28th, 1951
Publisher: Little, Brown