COMMONSENSE HEALTH: A Doctor's Frank Prescription for Getting the Best Care for Less by

COMMONSENSE HEALTH: A Doctor's Frank Prescription for Getting the Best Care for Less

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KIRKUS REVIEW

How to get ""the best care for less""? Chiefly, it appears, by minimal recourse to doctors. In this collection of articles on general health matters from Woman Day, Self, Glamour, and others, Oppenheim takes the point of view that doctors should not be concerned with healthy people, only with curing the sick. (Good-by to ""health maintenance,"" ""preventive medicine,"" and most physicals as they are presently done.) His pet peeves, correspondingly, are people who visit the doctor unnecessarily (don't use fever or specific symptoms as signals, he says--the only thing that counts is how sick you feel), and people who have trouble communicating with their doctors (don't make judgments or diagnoses--just describe how you feel, briefly but fully). On other topics--colds, constipation, insomnia--Oppenheimer offers nothing new, and his discussions generally are too skimpy to be informative. The most interesting bit, in fact, is an account of Oppenheim's brief fling as a diet doctor (fresh out of training, and presumably for the money and good hours); but there is other curiosa--like his against-the-tide championship of the Pill (a ""superb, safe"" birth control method for ""millions of women""). Oppenheim aims his final shot at holistic medicine: ""what doctors practice when they don't understand what's wrong."" It's not up to your doctor to teach you about your body, he insists, it's up to you. ""So learn. Read a book."" Fine, up to a point--but not this one.

Pub Date: July 27th, 1981
Publisher: Wideview--dist. by Harper & Row