WHAT'S A NICE GIRL LIKE YOU DOING IN A PLACE LIKE THIS? by Joyce Teitz

WHAT'S A NICE GIRL LIKE YOU DOING IN A PLACE LIKE THIS?

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This might be systems analysis or oceanography or physics or any one of eleven fields where those high-profiled here by Teitz (she doesn't bother ms. . . ing around), a Harvard lawyer, are achieving. They belong to a thirtyish age group, eight of them are married, six are mothers and only six again have paid household help; they almost all have no truck with mystique or sexual politics (as one says ""the screaming turns me off"") and are pretty much self-liberated; as the author says they are active, uncompromised, charismatic and defined. ""Woman is a noun, not a verb. It is something we are, not something we do."" You'll meet Anne Zill who converted from watching daytime TV to broadcast journalism after three children; public interest lawyer Marian Edelman; Quaker doctor, Marjorie Nelson, captured during the 1968 Tet offensive; Marian Edey, campaign committee chairman and one of the ""best groomed"" minds in Washington; and so on. Miss Teitz who also has a lively intelligence has managed to invest these accounts with a fair degree of intimacy and integrity so that on the one hand her very nice girls are knowable, on the other admirable, and somewhere in between enjoyable.

Pub Date: June 23rd, 1972
Publisher: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan