FROM BEGINNING TO END by Jozsef Lengyel

FROM BEGINNING TO END

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Bread! Bread!...Only a small helping. Never enough."" Bread is the theme of this tale of life in a Siberian concentration camp, with its woodcutters and gravediggers, privileged to receive one-and-a-half pounds of bread daily, its less fortunate dying of starvation and fever. Andras, ill, is befriended and saved by Ivan Ossipovitch, the powerful cook, and lives to ride to freedom on ""Gay 508,"" the unscheduled freight train, where a young murderer harbors him. A meal and bath behind him, he goes to work in town, only to be hauled back to Siberia, a free man in an orbit restricted on pain of reincarceration. In envoi, he cries, ""May there be bread for everybody'"" The Hungarian born author, editor, poet and revolutionary who spent eighteen years in such camps following the Stalinist purges of 1937 writes with a convincing sincerity and simplicity. Another voice via East Europe: is anyone listening?

Pub Date: Feb. 17th, 1967
Publisher: Prentice-Hall