THE FORESTS OF THE NIGHT by J.P.S. Brown

THE FORESTS OF THE NIGHT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Brown's novel Jim Kane became the Paul Newman-Lee Marvin flick Pocket Money. His new novel is even more cinematic, gripping, and deadly funny as only Mexican black comedy can be (Brown himself is an Arizona cattleman). A life worth two cents is overvalued in the Serranos--the high wild mountains where Adan Martinillo hunts a marauding jaguar he names El Yoco (the Devil). Fat El Yoco, spoiled with success, has a wounded eye which drives him to an outrageous string of killings. Adan is well-known as a monomaniacal hunter who leaves his wife and kids for weeks on end when he succumbs to the hunting urge. He's also a mescal addict mesmerized by a typical alcoholic quest to make the perfect killing in his trade. Meanwhile, Chombe, a quintessential worm-turned-killer, also goes on a spree in the hills, adding rape to gleeful murder. The bloody climax in a pool hall is high-tension theater, while the coda of man-meets-cat only happens when Adan gives up all hope of killing the beast. First-rate Mexidrama with sharptoothed humor.

Pub Date: Sept. 12th, 1974
ISBN: 0595503357
Publisher: Dial