COMPUTERS: THE MACHINES MEN THINK WITH by  Jr. Halacy

COMPUTERS: THE MACHINES MEN THINK WITH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This ""comprehensive coverage of computers for the layman"" should not frighten away those fearful of dull, scientific explanations. Although the workings of the digital computers are explained as simply as possible -- an understanding of these portions of the book is not necessary, for the overall treatment conveys not only a sense of historical perspective but of the outlook for the future, intriguing as well as possibly terrifying. From the time the Hindus gave the world the figure for zero, from the Chinese abacus, and on to the present ""teen age"" of machine thinking (which includes its poetry and musical compositions, chess playing, etc.), this views the progress and potential in revolutionizing procedures in business, government, science and television. A fast developing field, playing a greater part in our lives than many realize, is ably presented, with lively writing, for alerted businessmen, industrialists, all kinds of institutions and organizations wanting to know more about computers.

Pub Date: Oct. 24th, 1962
Publisher: Harper & Row