FROM A RAW DEAL TO A NEW DEAL? by Jr. Trotter

FROM A RAW DEAL TO A NEW DEAL?

Age Range: 12 & up
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KIRKUS REVIEW

 In a new series, The Young Oxford History of African Americans, comes this powerful volume, subtitled ``African Americans 19291945.'' Trotter finds that the period was paradoxical for blacks; for perhaps the first time since Reconstruction, there were rays of hope that full equality with whites was possible even though African-Americans--traditionally ``last hired, first fired''--had a higher unemployment rate than any other group. With Roosevelt's election to the presidency, Trotter writes, blacks believed in FDR enough to make new demands for ``full access to the fruits of American citizenship and democracy'' and came together as a community to support the New Deal. It took WW II, however, to open real doors of opportunity for African-Americans. By 1945, the stage was set for the modern civil rights movement. This is a balanced and unbiased treatment of a turbulent but nevertheless hopeful era in the history of African- Americans; readers will gain a real sense of the influences on the current and future states of race relations in the US. (b&w photos, maps, chronology, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 12+)

Pub Date: Dec. 1st, 1995
ISBN: 0-19-508771-2
Page count: 125pp
Publisher: Oxford Univ.
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15th, 1995