LIFE LINES

THE STORY OF THE NEW GENETICS

The study of genetics is certain to come to the forefront and demand our immediate attention in the 21st century, for modern geneticists now assert that “all disease has a genetic link.” The Kidds (Mother Nature’s Pharmacy, p. 896, etc.) thoroughly examine the evolution of the study of genetics, from its first pioneer in the 1880s, George Mendel, to the current and complex Human Genome Project of the 1990s. The identification of malfunctioning genes, gene-replacement therapy, the use of genetics in crime detection, biohazards, cloning and its ethical considerations—all of these are carefully analyzed in this resource. Socially significant and timely, this latest book in the Science and Society series elucidates the concerns, controversies, and promises that genetic research holds for our ever-changing society. Intriguing, unsolved genetic mysteries conclude this inclusive text to spark the imagination and spirit of inquiry in the young mind. (b&w photos, index, not seen, glossary, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 12-17)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-8160-3586-5

Page Count: 160

Publisher: Facts On File

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1998

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JAM!

THE STORY OF JAZZ MUSIC

A busy page design—artily superimposed text and photos, tinted portraits, and break-out boxes—and occasionally infelicitous writing (“Trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie became . . . bandleader of the quintet at the Onyx Club, from which bebop got its name”) give this quick history of jazz a slapdash air, but Lee delves relatively deeply into the music’s direct and indirect African roots, then goes beyond the usual tedious tally of names to present a coherent picture of specific influences and innovations associated with the biggest names in jazz. A highly selective discography will give readers who want to become listeners a jump start; those seeking more background will want to follow this up with James Lincoln Collier’s Jazz (1997). (glossary, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 9-11)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-8239-1852-1

Page Count: 64

Publisher: N/A

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1999

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An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist.

MAYA LIN

THINKING WITH HER HANDS

One of the world’s most celebrated creators of civic architecture is profiled in this accessible, engaging biography.

Similar in style and format to her Everybody Paints!: The Lives and Art of the Wyeth Family (2014) and Wideness and Wonder: The Life and Art of Georgia O’Keeffe (2011), Rubin’s well-researched profile examines the career, creative processes, and career milestones of Maya Lin. Rubin discusses at length Lin’s most famous achievement, designing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Chinese-American Lin was a reserved college student who entered and won the competition to design and build the memorial. Her youth and ethnicity were subjects of great controversy, and Rubin discusses how Lin fought to ensure her vision of the memorial remained intact. Other notable works by Lin, including the Civil Rights Memorial for the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama, a library and chapel for the Children’s Defense Fund, the Museum of Chinese in America, and the outdoor Wave Field project are examined but not in as much depth as the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Attractively designed, the book is illustrated extensively with color photos and drawings.

An engaging, admiring, and insightful portrait of an uncompromising, civic-minded, visionary artist. (bibliography, source notes, index) (Biography. 12-15)

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-4521-0837-7

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Review Posted Online: Aug. 21, 2017

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 2017

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