THE LIFE OF DANIEL HALE WILLIAMS by Judith Kaye

THE LIFE OF DANIEL HALE WILLIAMS

Age Range: 8 - 12
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

 In the Pioneers in Health and Medicine series, a useful replacement for Lillie Patterson's Sure Hands, Strong Heart (1981) and other out-of-print biographies that Kaye lists ``For Further Reading.'' Credited with the first successful heart operation (in 1893; the patient lived another 50 years), the African-American surgeon (1856-1931) was also a gifted teacher, founder of Chicago's Provident Hospital (open to all), and an important force in opening the medical profession to black nurses and physicians. Kaye's biography is clear, well organized, and entirely laudatory; ironically, if she had admitted a few faults, perhaps in connection with colleague George Hall's relentless animosity, or the criticism leveled at Williams's innovative administration of Washington's Freedmen's Hospital, her admiring portrait would seem more credible. Still, she's forthright about his troubles with racism, both from whites and from darker- skinned African-Americans. A good, workmanlike resource on an important figure. B&w photos; index. (Biography. 8-12)

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1993
ISBN: 0-8050-2302-X
Page count: 80pp
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 15th, 1993