THE HALL OF THE MOUNTAIN KING: Vol. I of Avaryan Rising by Judith Tarr

THE HALL OF THE MOUNTAIN KING: Vol. I of Avaryan Rising

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The disappointing opening volume of another fantasy trilogy, entitled Avaryan Rising, following The Hound and the Falcon trilogy (most recently The Hounds of God, p. 170). The old king of the mountain kingdom Ianon waits in vain for his beloved long-lost daughter to return and claim the throne, Instead, young grandson Mirain shows up; and since his father was the Sun God, Mirain is both a great mage and a telepath, and he receives advice and encouragement from his father. Overjoyed, the old king gives Mirain a squire, Vadin, and declares Mirain his heir--much to the chagrin of Mirain's half. brother, prince Moranden. Soon enough, the old king dies, so Mirain, while growing up, must learn to be a strong king without resorting to the wholesale violence he abhors. Meanwhile, Moranden, prodded by his evil-sorceress mother (she's powered by the netherworld Deathgoddess) schemes to depose him. Tarr, in a tribute to her narrative skills if not her inventive prowess, manages to spin out this unequal contest for 288 pages. The upshot is a great deal of pleasant, undemanding embroidery, but the ideas are lackluster, the symbolism trite--and the plot's stretched so thin it twangs. Tarr clearly is talented; this is simply a case of too much too soon.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1986
Publisher: Bluejay--dist. by St. Martin's