A tightly written, succinct investment guide and a solid launching pad for anyone thinking about buying and selling stocks...

How to Profit from China

THE ONLY BOOK YOU NEED TO START INVESTING PROFITABLY IN CHINESE STOCKS

A debut primer on analyzing, buying, and selling Chinese stocks for fun and profit.

Blomberg, a Finnish author who founded and runs the website China Speculator, began investing in stocks in 1997 using money from a summer job and became interested in Chinese stocks after traveling to that country. Despite recent downturns in the Chinese economy and stock markets, he writes that the country is still an attractive speculation for those with a contrarian perspective, due to its high growth rate compared with Western countries. However, he says that investors must understand China’s changing economy, which is moving from dependence on heavy manufacturing to domination by service industries. Among the most attractive stocks in the latter category, he says, are those of companies involved in environmental cleanup, recreation, education, and culture, including Internet companies, some of which he briefly describes. But although Blomberg is bullish on China’s potential returns, he’s far from a stock tout. He takes a cautious approach throughout and warns readers that his book should serve only as a starting point for further research. He also gives advice on where to invest, saying, for instance, that companies on the Singapore stock market have been plagued with accounting scandals but may offer attractive valuations compared with those on the New York Stock Exchange, which may be safer bets but cost more. He also offers advice on how to buy, advocating purchasing securities in tranches when a stock is going up, rather than trying to get a bargain when a stock’s falling. He also provides tips on when to sell. Overall, although Blomberg says his book is for both new and experienced China investors, it will probably be most useful for the former. It offers readers plenty of investment ideas to follow up on, as well as resources for researching Chinese companies that interest them. The author gives lots of sage suggestions in this book, such as “Question everything” and “Do not argue with the markets,” which can only come from personal experience. Although there are few, if any, guarantees for any investments in modern times, his disciplined system for making profits and avoiding losses might offer readers a fighting chance.

A tightly written, succinct investment guide and a solid launching pad for anyone thinking about buying and selling stocks from China.

Pub Date: April 5, 2016

ISBN: 978-9-52-936783-2

Page Count: 146

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: June 20, 2016

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NUTCRACKER

This is not the Nutcracker sweet, as passed on by Tchaikovsky and Marius Petipa. No, this is the original Hoffmann tale of 1816, in which the froth of Christmas revelry occasionally parts to let the dark underside of childhood fantasies and fears peek through. The boundaries between dream and reality fade, just as Godfather Drosselmeier, the Nutcracker's creator, is seen as alternately sinister and jolly. And Italian artist Roberto Innocenti gives an errily realistic air to Marie's dreams, in richly detailed illustrations touched by a mysterious light. A beautiful version of this classic tale, which will captivate adults and children alike. (Nutcracker; $35.00; Oct. 28, 1996; 136 pp.; 0-15-100227-4)

Pub Date: Oct. 28, 1996

ISBN: 0-15-100227-4

Page Count: 136

Publisher: Harcourt

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 1996

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IN MY PLACE

From the national correspondent for PBS's MacNeil-Lehrer Newshour: a moving memoir of her youth in the Deep South and her role in desegregating the Univ. of Georgia. The eldest daughter of an army chaplain, Hunter-Gault was born in what she calls the ``first of many places that I would call `my place' ''—the small village of Due West, tucked away in a remote little corner of South Carolina. While her father served in Korea, Hunter-Gault and her mother moved first to Covington, Georgia, and then to Atlanta. In ``L.A.'' (lovely Atlanta), surrounded by her loving family and a close-knit black community, the author enjoyed a happy childhood participating in activities at church and at school, where her intellectual and leadership abilities soon were noticed by both faculty and peers. In high school, Hunter-Gault found herself studying the ``comic-strip character Brenda Starr as I might have studied a journalism textbook, had there been one.'' Determined to be a journalist, she applied to several colleges—all outside of Georgia, for ``to discourage the possibility that a black student would even think of applying to one of those white schools, the state provided money for black students'' to study out of state. Accepted at Michigan's Wayne State, the author was encouraged by local civil-rights leaders to apply, along with another classmate, to the Univ. of Georgia as well. Her application became a test of changing racial attitudes, as well as of the growing strength of the civil-rights movement in the South, and Gault became a national figure as she braved an onslaught of hostilities and harassment to become the first black woman to attend the university. A remarkably generous, fair-minded account of overcoming some of the biggest, and most intractable, obstacles ever deployed by southern racists. (Photographs—not seen.)

Pub Date: Nov. 1, 1992

ISBN: 0-374-17563-2

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1992

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