HAMMERHEAD by Julian Jay Savarin

HAMMERHEAD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Logan and Pross, the plucky pair who hovered their way through Lynx and Gunship, Savarin's earlier chopper thrillers, return with a new helicopter that's smarter than Mortimer Adler. How long can this go on? Every time devoted family man David Pross gets well and comfortably settled into his prosperous little Welsh helicopter-charter business, here comes the glamorous, fast-shooting, secret-agent Sian Logan with an invitation to take a ride in her new car. Her new car is always faster than anything Pross flies, and she always steers him into some dreadful scrape organized by the scheming, aristocratic Col. Fowler. This time Logan takes Pross to play with the top-secret new Hammerhead helicopter, an especially quiet, one-of-a-kind techno-marvel packing enough heat to blow up an entire Third World air force without even breathing hard. Pross gets to ring all the bells and blow all the whistles on a nighttime test flight in Snowdonia--an event that attracts unpleasant foreigners equipped with the latest in heat-seeking missiles and other sharp objects. Pross blows all away, except for a lady and gentleman who chase the pilot and the glamorous agent to a delightful inn in an unpronounceable town. The dangerous lady is captured, the gentleman escapes, and the chase is resumed months later in Tibet, where Logan has become a prisoner. Lots of guns go off, but the big deal in this series seems to be whether Pross and Logan will ever fall into each other's arms. The tease is getting awfully long.

Pub Date: April 15th, 1988
Publisher: St. Martin's