LYNX by Julian Jay Savarin

LYNX

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

From the author of four science-fiction novels and Waterhole (1984), this is the latest in British helicopters against treacherous Orientals and civil-service mandarins, as devoted family man and wizard pilot David Pross tries to rescue his best friend from the People's Republic. A bad day at the office gets worse when ex-RAF navigator and struggling businessman Pross is recruited for duty by two different sets of heavies. Giving Mr. Ling of the CIA/Taiwan team the boot, Pross reluctantly signs on with Her Majesty's thugs. He's introduced to Lynx, the top-of-the-line helicopter, and learns that he's to fly his one-time pilot over the hostile border and into Hong Kong. But after putting the Lynx through its paces, Pross comes home to find that British security is no more. The team guarding his family has been wiped out by Ling, who is taking tea with Pross' wife. Before the cups are rinsed, Pross has to agree to cooperate with Ling & Co. Pross is teamed by the Brits with beautiful, sharpshooting Sian Logan, a brainy bodyguard with bullets taped to her perfect thighs. When it becomes obvious that Security is leaking (H.M. corpses piled to the ceiling), Logan takes Pross to Hong Kong her own way--which includes a heart-stopping trip up the auto. strada at 200mph in a Ferrari driven by a mere slip of a girl. Plenty of treachery and hairy high-tech dogfights leave no time for sightseeing as Pross and Logan shoot through to the climax in Hong Kong. Technology stars here but it's intelligible, and there's plenty of agreeable tension in this squeaky-clean adventure.

Pub Date: May 23rd, 1986
Publisher: Walker