PUPPETS AND MARIONETTES and WOODWORKING; SEWING by

PUPPETS AND MARIONETTES and WOODWORKING; SEWING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Although in all of these information about equipment and methods is fairly clear and complete, the organization of material and the tone of presentation have some drawbacks worth considering. Each of the books is divided into first -- a discussion of equipment and then- suggestions for things to make. But the simple progression of events seems to fall apart in instances like the one in Woodworking where the use of a drill is required before it is explained, or in Puppets and Marionettes where the reader is launched into papier-mache work explained haphazardly and without a true sense of the care and time involved. In all three books the suggestions are traditional- pot holders, photograph albums, aprons, stock clown heads for the marionettes, and so forth. Illustrations are neat, accurate and in accordance with the text, but on the whole, these three books will probably leave young doers wondering what to make next, instead of clamouring to get back to the work bench or the needle case. Definitely too, a lot of parental help and advice will be necessary.

Pub Date: March 31st, 1952
Publisher: Knopf