DR. GARDNER'S STORIES ABOUT THE REAL WORLD by

DR. GARDNER'S STORIES ABOUT THE REAL WORLD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Though they are labeled as stories and introduced by the author (a child psychiatrist who wrote The Boys' and Girls' Book About Divorce, 1970) as an antidote to ""excessive involvement with fantasy,"" we can't imagine that Dr. Gardner really expects children to curl up for a good read with these undisguised exercises in bibliotherapy. However, concerned grownups might find their jobs a little easier if they can suggest, where the shoe fits, the tale of Oliver who improves his schoolwork and makes some friends after he learns to face painful situations, Eric who learns that saying he's sorry can't exempt him from the consequences of his behavior, Helen (the only girl among the six subjects) who finds out that losing isn't as bad as not trying, or Jerry who discovers that getting mad back helps keep the bullies away. For impatient readers it's a less talky, more directive approach than LeShan's What Makes Me Feel This Way (p. 139, J-43) and Lowenheim's drawings give the informally told stories a bouncy, lighthearted air.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1972
Publisher: Prentice-Hall