THE CENTURY OF THE DETECTIVE by Jurgen Thorwald

THE CENTURY OF THE DETECTIVE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With all of the tenacious research, and without the intrusive first person device of his earlier The Century of the Surgeon. Thorwald transfers to the allied scientific disciplines used in the development of procedural criminal detection and provides a massive dossier. This is a four part study: of identification, as Bertillon, the illhumored, unappreciated clerk in the Surete developed his system of body measurements which were later to be replaced by dactylography; of forensic medicine, as bodies, bloodstains, hairs, etc. could be submitted to microscopic, milligrammatic analysis; of forensic toxicology and forensic ballistics. Famous cases from every continent exemplify -- the Gouffe case, Harvey Crippen, Marie Lafarge and Sacco & Vanzetti, along with a formidable number unfamiliar to the common reader. Thorwald, while never"" a spirited writer, is extremely conscientious and no detail is smudged as he wraps a winding sheet of irrefutable facts around this developmental history of detection. It has been translated by the Winstons and presented in a handsome format comparable to the earlier books with 16 pages of illustrations. They had a substantial sale.

Pub Date: Oct. 27th, 1965
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace & World