A solid handbook with basic tips and ideas for aspiring managers, particularly those who are millennials or expect to manage...

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Millennial Leadership

THE ULTIMATE MANAGEMENT GUIDE FOR GEN Y LEADERS

Debut authors Eliassi and Thompson’s work combines their experience to produce a guide for millennials hoping to become managers and managers hoping to lead millennials.

Eliassi, a millennial, struggled to master management skills. He teamed up with Thompson, an experienced manager and executive, through SCORE, a mentorship program, and used Thompson’s articles and teachings as the basis for this book. The guide outlines step-by-step plans for implementing change, developing leadership traits, creating vision-building tools like mission statements, and using time-management tips. Eliassi, who narrates the book, segues into strategic and tactical plans and ways to craft and use them. Next, he discusses effective communication with an emphasis on intercompany messages. He then moves onto team building, dedicating several chapters to identifying critical positions to fill both now and in the future, recruiting and hiring the right people for those positions, and training and coaching them successfully. He wraps up with a quick summary, touching on the top 10 lessons from the introduction and previous chapters. Because Eliassi is a millennial and Thompson is a baby boomer, they bring not only their differing perspectives, but also well-considered suggestions for working with one another. For example, Eliassi points out that millennials have different priorities from Gen Xers or baby boomers, preferring a healthy work-life balance to a higher salary and looking for positions that offer fast-track advancement and that allow them to make a difference. The more generalized management and HR advice they offer is perfectly sound, if not very revolutionary.

A solid handbook with basic tips and ideas for aspiring managers, particularly those who are millennials or expect to manage them.

Pub Date: April 28, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-692-69647-7

Page Count: 190

Publisher: GlobalView Publishing

Review Posted Online: Nov. 28, 2016

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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