THERE IS A SEASON by Karen Rose
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THERE IS A SEASON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Katie Levin is another Brooklyn Girl (1963) and she tells her story in a perky fashion which should appeal to almost any other girl: she's going on Sixteen, impressionable, and she's willing to admit she falls in love ""for strange reasons."" Her parents also look on her latest objective-one Jamey McAllister--as a little strange; they're religiously observant Jews and her brother's Bar Mitzvah closes the book here. Before the end there will have been slight and somewhat more serious episodes; her father's heart attack; her quarrel with Jamey, etc. but the book is to be read for its interlinear commentary on death and God and first sexual encounters, all of which gives it a certain significance and structure. As Katie says, ""Originality is my most remarkable gift"" and it is certainly a primary attraction in a book of this kind for this age group.

Pub Date: Nov. 13th, 1967
Publisher: Follett