BROOKLYN GIRL by Karen Rose

BROOKLYN GIRL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This spirited study of a seventh grader's reactions to her city world is amusing, but compared to a remarkable earlier book about city life--It's Like This, Cat (1963, p. 362, J-128) by Emily Neville, it is a pallid affair. Skinny Kay Ross has more imagination, energy and nerve than any of her comrades, with the exception of Brant Gold. When the author focuses on Kay in the city--sledding in Prospect Park, campaigning for a school election, picking up stray cats-- the story is strong and above ordinary, but when she transplants Kay to a farm, the spark dies. Fortunately she comes round again and leaves Kay happily greeting Brant on the front stoop. The subway rides, the trip to Coney, the general honking and buzzing background will be appreciated by city dwellers, who must get hay fever from their constant exposure to barnyard and pasture in print.

Pub Date: Oct. 4th, 1963
Publisher: ollett