IN THE LAND OF THE MIND by Karen Rose

IN THE LAND OF THE MIND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

When Rose isn't providing capsule explanations of Zen, Yoga, biofeedback, Freudian and Jungian unconscious, dream research, and even relativity and quantum theory (these last derived, it seems, from a skimming of Asimov's Guide to Science [1972]), she is citing case after case of alleged telepathy, clairvoyance, psychokinesis, healing (of both plants and people) with prayer, and other phenomena that have staggered and amazed hitherto skeptical witnesses. The point seems to be that as previously unthinkable mind powers and conscious states are now commonly acknowledged, so too might psychic powers be proven. (Also, the altered states seem to be a necessary precondition to psychic activity.) But instead of pursuing the argument Rose merely suggests it, preferring to pile up examples of psychic achievements which are only impressive if, like her, we take the quoted observers' (or participants') word for what occurred. Rose herself never investigates any of the incidents for possibilities of cheating, other explanations, etc., and the sources for the reports she cites throughout as facts are mentioned only in an appended bibliography (which includes the works of profiled mystics Sai Baba, Eileen Garrett, Edgar Cayce, etc.). We confess to the prejudice Rose so frequently complains about but can also respect a conscientious inquiry, even if it doesn't convince us. But Rose, who reports with similar blandness and gullibility the results of Duke's Dr. Rhine (""Why would a man of such reputable qualifications devote himself to a lifelong project of cheating?"") and the claims of Philippine psychic surgeon Tony Agpaoa, is unlikely to further the cause of either.

Pub Date: April 18th, 1975
Page count: 265pp
Publisher: Atheneum