BROTHER MOUKY AND THE FALLING SUN by Karen Whiteside

BROTHER MOUKY AND THE FALLING SUN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A picture book? Mouky, a black boy of ten or more, is angry at his brother and eager to get back at him (much mumbling to himself), but also mindful of his mother's words: ""Don't let the sun go down and you be staying angry at someone."" He confides his troubles to a cat, and tries to persuade an apartment building to ""catch the sun on your roof,"" a spider to ""pull the sun back up into the clouds,"" a tree to ""catch the sun in your arms"". . . until the sun, implored not to set, tells Mouky to make peace with his brother (""Tell your brother his words hurt you. Let him say he's sorry, and tell him it's okay""), and Mouky turns homeward to do just that. The unspoken dialogue constitutes most of the wordy text; absolutely nothing happens in the empty, dull-toned pictures either; and why any child should attend to this fanciful, totally extrinsic development of a realistic situation is hard to imagine.

Pub Date: Sept. 10th, 1980
Publisher: Harper & Row