AUNT VINNIE'S VICTORIOUS SIX by Karin Anckarsvard

AUNT VINNIE'S VICTORIOUS SIX

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With the publication of each new Anckarsvard title, the battle between those who like her work and those who don't grows hotter. This volume will do little to cool the temperature. Chapter One opens with nine-year-old Per showing his seventy-year-old aunt how to fill in a soccer pool form. Chapter Twelve closes with Aunt Vinnie having won the pool. In between, Per makes friends with Jose, a four-year-old Negro from the French Congo, whom he calls mon frere-- he wants a younger brother and the author wants to remind us that all men are brothers. Plot emphasis shifts between Per and Lottle, twelve. When she breaks Aunt Vinnie's 18th century bowl her composure goes. Unable to wait for the owner of a replacement to return, Lottie breaks into the house and carries it off with the help of a policeman. Lottie had permission to acquire the bowl, but house-breaking seems a drastic method and police cooperation strange, to say the least. Of the other four children, only Annika, sixteen, is more than a name, primarily because of continuing references to her physical attractiveness and the hours she spends locked in her room studying with her boyfriend. The audience is difficult to predict-- certainly not boys, despite Per's presence; younger girls may, but with how much understanding?

Pub Date: March 11th, 1964
Publisher: arcourt, Brace & World