AS ORANGE GOES: Twelve California Families and the Future of American Politics by Karl A. Lamb

AS ORANGE GOES: Twelve California Families and the Future of American Politics

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Twenty-three adults (one wife from these twelve couples refused to have anything to do with Lamb, a political scientist at the University of California) who hold diverse opinions but some traits in common, all of whom were shattered by Watergate . . . but not too much; are not racist. . . yet think of injustice as existing somewhere else (i.e., for blacks in the South); believe in the power of the vote. . . but remain apolitical; disapproved of the anti-war movement (even if later coming to share the same view). . . yet consider their own activism valid, as when they protested a proposed freeway. Lamb spent four years interviewing them, a sampling he selected as typical of their Orange County, California background -- well educated (aside from four who attended only high school), with an average income of $26,000 and a mix of ethnic if not racial origins -- affluent technocrats. Still, such a statistically insignificant microsample doesn't tell us much about ""the future of American politics,"" only about the McGees, Rineharts, Pavels, etc. and how they live the American Dream and firmly believe in our right to do likewise. And they might even get around to taking some political action -- after that new patio is finished.

Pub Date: Sept. 23rd, 1974
Publisher: Norton