THE MANAGEMENT OF SCIENTISTS by Karl- Ed. Hill

THE MANAGEMENT OF SCIENTISTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Apparently scientists have got to be managed and this more and more so as both the ends and means of modern technology become increasingly obscure. The questions posed of not answered here are not only how and why to manage, but what are these strange beings we call scientists, anyway, and who should do the managing? The six chapters, originally given as public lectures at Northeastern University last year and still showing traces of the podium, are by Everett Mendelsohn, Anne Roe, Royden C. Sanders, Jr., Albert F. Siepert, Norman Kaplan, and Herbert Shepard. Four of these contributors are university faculty members, in either the history of science or behavioral science; the other two are practising managers of scientists and engineers, one in government, the other in industry. They treat, in turn, the historical and psychological backgrounds of research work, management problems in the laboratories, and then the general topics related to and likely prospects for efficient and efficacious organization. The tone, throughout, is determinedly optimistic. Bureaucracy and science have much in common, we are repeatedly told; and hand in hand, whether we will or no, the pair of them is going to yank us all into tomorrow.

Pub Date: Sept. 22nd, 1964
Publisher: Beacon Press