KARL MARX ON REVOLUTION by Karl Marx

KARL MARX ON REVOLUTION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Padover says he sought to compile all Marx's writings on ""revolution"" -- as opposed, presumably, to ""economics"": this would explain the absence of a major work like Poverty of Philosophy. In general, the collection emphasizes Marx's writings on contemporary events rather than his theoretical works; there are letters, on Spain for example, and articles and speeches not previously available in English, along with nearly all his commentaries on the French revolutions of 1848 and 1871 and the upheavals in Germany and Spain. There is a strong representation of Marx's activities in helping to lead the German revolution, organizing the Communist League, drafting programs, buying arms for the workers, and persevering in journalism. Ironically, Padover's introduction makes the quirky claim that in his later years Marx repudiated the idea of revolution and viewed the Paris Commune with horror. No hard evidence is offered for this notion, but the book does include four vehement defenses of the Paris Commune written in 1871. On balance, a useful combination of standards like the Communist Manifesto and The Eighteenth Brumaire and less familiar writings like the 1850 outline of the theory of the ""united front."" Marx comes through more as an active participant in history and less as the carbuncled bookworm of the British Museum. A lengthy but superficial chronology of Marx's life is prefixed.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1971
Publisher: McGraw-Hill