RICE IN THE WIND by Kathean Wallace

RICE IN THE WIND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Discerning, likeable story of China today and the white colony, a book for feminine tastes primarily. It is in part concerned with an adjustment to marriage, when Jane, daughter of a missionary doctor, brought up in an isolated mountain village, marries the very eligible, more worldly Consul of Ter-ho, Martin Drummond. Jane, unused to and by the tea table, ma jong society of Ter-ho, feels uncomfortable and unpopular. Her friendship with , a high born Chinese girl who represents the new China, and , a flamboyant American, mark her as even more of an outsider. A break comes when Jane is put off Martin by two of his former and still envious women friends. She rejoins her father just as the Japanese attack the province; but eventually she and Martin are reunited and go to England to Join actively in the war. Essentially light, but pleasant reading. The publishers plan trade advertising, post cards, etc.

Pub Date: Feb. 26th, 1943
Publisher: Putnam