ANDREW CARNEGIE AND THE AGE OF STEEL by Katherine B. Shippen

ANDREW CARNEGIE AND THE AGE OF STEEL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Over the portals of many libraries is the emblem of the industrialist philanthropist, Andrew Carnegie. An open book and the inscription ""Let There Be Light"" stamps those institutions that he established. The Scotch boy from Dumferline had scanty acquaintance with books himself, for he spent his adolescence as an apprentice in a telegraph office. Later his experience with railroads served him well, for he was able to foresee the implications of the inexpensive process perfected by Bessemer for the manufacture of steel. This is an adequate presentation of Carnegie's life story -- the prototype of tycoons amassing, then dispersing, wealth. But it seems superfluous in the light of the two relatively recent biographies, Kathleen Fidler's The Man Who Gave Away Millions and Alvin Harlow's superior Andrew Carnegie. Landmark.

Pub Date: Aug. 28th, 1958
Publisher: Random House