MY MOTHER WORKED AND I TURNED OUT OKAY by Katherine Goldman

MY MOTHER WORKED AND I TURNED OUT OKAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

 A lighthearted but not empty-headed look at adult children of working mothers. Goldman, herself the working mother of two, grew up with a mom (Lois Wyse, who contributes an afterword) who's both a top advertising executive and a popular author (Seconds, 1990, etc.). Here, Goldman uses her own experience and that of dozens of other grown-ups whose mothers had jobs or careers to reassure young parents that their own kids probably will grow up to be productive, caring, and happy. Leading off are the ``12 principles of working motherhood,'' including the comforting rule that ``No child ever fails to recognize Mother when she comes home from work,'' and that mantra of latchkey children, ``The bad news is your mother's not there when you get home from school; the good news is your mother's not there when you get home from school.'' There are discussions of many of the asked, as well as unasked, questions that trouble two- career families, such as, ``Will the children love the baby sitter more than they love me?'' No, says Goldman: Even if you don't bake cookies and supervise play-dates, you do establish values and set an example of what it's like to be a fulfilled and productive adult (principle 8: ``Children of working mothers know the value of working women''). Is there a downside? Of course, including the frazzled Supermom whose children feel they aren't getting enough attention (principle 11: ``Working mothers develop instant amnesia about how tough it was to raise kids. It takes the children a little longer''). But as both Goldman and her mother point out, the payoff is in good relationships when the children become adults and face the same choices. Celebrating the resilience of children and their parents: a cheerful antidote to those who rail against working mothers.

Pub Date: April 1st, 1993
ISBN: 0-679-41544-0
Page count: 128pp
Publisher: Villard
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1st, 1993