THE THREE-CORNERED HOUSE by Kathleen Ford

THE THREE-CORNERED HOUSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An ornately witty, wise-cracking, far out fancy all about a reedy rumble of beautiful people, as confronted by a likable All American square, Lieu-Lieu, when she weekends at a seaside pleasure dome. Among the glittering originals who decorate in varying degrees of lassitude and longitude the house of hostess Vicomtesse Arianne de Kempis (""a mammoth untitled work""): an industrialist; a brace of ""very rich collectors""; a doctor and his wife, a model of romantic parentage; a pregnant Hindu; an ""androcentric"" Persian; old pal Gloria, ""with a build of pure viraginity""; Rocky, a Harlem hotshot; a screeching of kids; and Alice Hazel, with boats sailing over her enormous heaving bosom. Somewhere along the line, there are sporting and unsporting rape attempts; red ants perish luxuriously in whipped cream; precious objets d'art are smashed or given birth on; there is a whooping mud party; and the measureless merriment closes with a witches' cauldron and a flat-chested witch, as Lieu-Lieu ladles out comeuppance. Although the Fun Tunnel leads nowhere in particular--it's a good trip.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1968
Publisher: McGraw Hill