WANDERERS EASTWARD, WANDERERS WEST by Kathleen Winsor

WANDERERS EASTWARD, WANDERERS WEST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Forever after Forever Amber, and some seven years after her start on her present novel, Kathleen Winsor has reduced her original manuscript from a fat 4,247 pages to a stylish stout 1,453. She has written a story about the post-Civil War expansion of the Montana Territory from a handful of mining camps into a State, and the disappearance of the last frontier. Seductively easy-to-read, her preoccupations are predictable from past performance as she writes of some dozen main characters and numerous individuals less important to the plot: there are a bevy of interrelated love triangles in the novel which contrasts the earthy Devlin clan of goldminers with their relatives, the Chings of New York and Wall Street. Despite violent events (duels, robberies, murders), the book maintains a composure dictated by its phlegmatic style. Dealing with epic materials, Miss Winsor has dramatized them and domesticated them for a palpable audience who will read on and on and on.

Publisher: Random House