THERE'S A JOB FOR YOU IN FOOD SERVICE by Kathy Pelta

THERE'S A JOB FOR YOU IN FOOD SERVICE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Do young people really need a book that tells them what ""buspersons"" do, that dishwashers don't need experience to be hired, that the porter is a ""very important worker in the back of the house,"" that ""In many cases the easiest way to get a job in a restaurant is to walk in and ask for one,"" and that ""fastfood outlets are good places for a young person to get started?"" And if anyone really aims (rather than settles) for such a job, would or should she/he read about them at all? Pelta also gives a general picture of the jobs of chef, shortorder cook, and manager, though the one that gets most space is that of waiter or waitress, described as hectic but ""a good temporary career for a young person."" She also describes the workings of fast food places, institution kitchens, airline feeding, and catering services. This is the kind of career book that surveys different kinds of food service training programs but doesn't assess any but the top cooking schools (and those only vaguely) in terms of their raising employment chances and earnings. Prospective cooking school students might find it worth a first glance; those considering an after-school job at Burger King are better advised to walk in and ask. There's no hard information anywhere--and too frequent use of the word ""elegant.

Pub Date: Oct. 15th, 1979
Publisher: Dodd, Mead