GLOOSCAP AND HIS MAGIC by Kay Hill

GLOOSCAP AND HIS MAGIC

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KIRKUS REVIEW

It's a seldom thing to find a collection of stories for reading and telling oud so well pre-tested before publication in book form. These were adapted from the abanaki legends for Canadian television. They were told on TV by Kathleen Currie, Chief Children's Librarian of the Halifax Memorial Library. Anyone lucky enough to save seen and heard the shows (some were shown in the U.S.) knows how smoothly they flow, how well the legends have been tightened for telling and the essential humor of the stories. Glooscap and his feats are Paul Bunyan-esque. The territorial background of these Indians is the eastern Canadian woodland region and these legends will not be unfamiliar to New England librarians who will recognize them (or variations which reached further south). The eight to eleven age will encounter little difficulty with the vocabulary in reading to themselves. The illustrations are well drawn, with humor. A pronouncing glossary of Indian words, and names is provided at the front.

Pub Date: Sept. 3rd, 1963
Publisher: Dodd, Mead