A solid foundation to help educators teach young people about appropriate behavior both on- and offline.

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CYBERSLAMMED

UNDERSTAND, PREVENT, COMBAT AND TRANSFORM THE MOST COMMON CYBERBULLYING TACTICS

A curriculum guide for teachers—and parents—who want to explore issues of cyberbullying with teens and preteens.

In six thematic lesson plans, each based on an example of a different type of online bullying behavior, Stephens and Nair present background information, discussion questions, and group and individual exercises designed for use in the classroom or an after-school program. The topics include ganging up against one person in an online environment, creating fake social media profiles, misuse of rating websites, and distribution of inappropriate photos and videos. The authors are aware of the fast-changing nature of social media platforms and wisely do not spend much time on the specifics of Facebook, YouTube or other currently popular sites. Instead, they break the incidents down into their individual components, encouraging students to understand the motivations behind inappropriate behavior, identify points at which a situation could be defused instead of escalated, and develop their own strategies for coping before problems arise. Each lesson includes “threat level assessments”; students are instructed to recommend responses to incidents that range from minor annoyances to significant issues. The lessons also include a one- to two-page essay directed at students that provides suggestions for emotional resilience and coping strategies, drawn largely from the work of a bullying and martial arts expert. The book’s format should make it clear to potential readers that it’s not written for a general audience; readers interested in narrative works on cyberbullying should look elsewhere. But the authors understand their target audience and provide all the information necessary for teachers to use a prepackaged curriculum or design their own. Some of the exercises provided are weaker than others, particularly an exploration of genocide included in the chapter on “Haters’ Clubs”; the authors note that it’s “the original text of this document and could not be altered for this workbook,” but it still seems to be stretching the metaphor too far.

A solid foundation to help educators teach young people about appropriate behavior both on- and offline.

Pub Date: July 10, 2012

ISBN: 978-0615641805

Page Count: 260

Publisher: sMashup Press

Review Posted Online: Aug. 8, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2013

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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