THE LEGEND OF HENRY FORD by Keith Sward

THE LEGEND OF HENRY FORD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Compared with Richards' The Last Billionaire (P. 619) this seems a deeper, more incisive exploration into the person known through his public manifestations. Acknowledging his genius as a mechanic, his daring, this contrasts his fumbling gestures on the labor front, his identification with prejudice groups, the fact vs the fiction spread by public relations, and then goes on to the equivocal position of Henry II, whether heir to the legend, or man of good will. Chapter and verse of Ford's career, from the opportunism of his appearance on the scene of the invention of the automobile, Old's mass production, the American acceptance of the motor idea, to his characteristics that made him an outstanding figure in mass acceptance of quantity output, a political lone wolf, or a national saint. This gives credit in the field of mechanics -- but failure in social history. Studious, controversial, but pointed in evaluation. Of business interest, chiefly.

Pub Date: June 10th, 1948
Publisher: Rinehart