A skillfully crafted war story that’s both touching and historically captivating.

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MISSING

A WORLD WAR II STORY OF LOVE, FRIENDSHIPS, COURAGE, AND SURVIVAL

A son’s debut biography focuses on his father’s service as a World War II pilot. 

Donald N. Evans was born and raised in a small town in Utah, the son of a farmer. His father descended from a long line of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who originally settled rural Lehi. Don was a prodigiously talented athlete—he was an all-state high school player in both basketball and football and a member of the varsity tennis team at Brigham Young University. Don was deeply in love with his high school sweetheart, Laura Jeanne, but on the other side of the Atlantic, war was ravaging Europe. In anticipation of the draft and stirred by patriotic duty, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps. Two months later, Don was called to duty and would eventually serve as a pilot in France and Belgium, stationed in Normandy, Chartres, Laon, and Chièvres. Author Kenneth D. Evans, Don’s son, stitched together this loving biography from sundry sources. They included his father’s brief memoir of the war, hundreds of love letters exchanged between Don and Laura Jeanne, and public records that the author scrupulously examined. Don’s eventful experiences overseas climaxed in terror—he was shot down over the Ardennes during the Battle of the Bulge, captured by enemy soldiers, and forced to march more than 200 miles under the most grueling conditions to a prisoner of war camp. He was subjected to days of intense interrogations, and back at home, Laura Jeanne was roiled by an official letter acknowledging that he was missing in action. The author impressively pulls off what is generally considered rare—a historically rigorous portrait of a subject for whom the writer harbors infinite affection. He also includes an endearingly intimate account of his own motivations: to fill in the gaps left by his father’s reticence regarding the war and fully understand the man he came to appreciate as a hero. Wisely, he lets Don tell his own story when he can: “I thought about the mess I was in, and wondered how I’d ever get out of it. Mostly, though, I thought about Laura Jeanne and Christmas Eve back home—wondering if we’d ever see another Christmas together.”

A skillfully crafted war story that’s both touching and historically captivating. 

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: 978-1-7323702-0-3

Page Count: 501

Publisher: Starhaven Publishing, LLC

Review Posted Online: Feb. 26, 2019

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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