THE FLIGHT OF IKAROS by Kevin Andrews

THE FLIGHT OF IKAROS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

After the last war the American author of this charming and sympathetic book on modern Greece received a series of grants to study Athenian archaeology and mediaeval Pelopennesian fortifications, the results of this study being published. In this beautifully written account of his Grecian experiences the author tells little of archaeology or Athens and nothing of fortresses, but writes instead of his own non-tourist wanderings on foot or by bus. Sleeping often where he found himself at night, treading grapes and attending village feasts, encountering many discomforts, some dangers and great kindliness, he made friends with peasants and scholars, brigands and shepherds, with victims of the war invasions and with ex-members of the Resistance who had killed many men; worried by bitter and uninformed Greek suspicion of American aid he tried, not too successfully, to allay the Greek dislike of America and bring about better methods of American relief administration. A book for more comprehensive public and lending libraries, this clear and readable volume should appeal to lovers of Greece and of minor adventure in foreign lands; because of its unbiased point of view it should be required reading for Congressional committees on American foreign aid and relations.

Pub Date: Aug. 20th, 1959
Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin