Kirkus Reviews QR Code
1775 by Kevin Phillips Kirkus Star

1775

A Good Year for Revolution

By Kevin Phillips

Pub Date: Nov. 27th, 2012
ISBN: 978-0-670-02512-1
Publisher: Viking

A noted historian and political commentator claims 1775 as the American Revolution’s true beginning.

It will probably take more than this deeply researched, meticulously argued, multidimensional history to dislodge 1776 from the popular mind as the inaugural year of our independence, but Phillips (Bad Money: Reckless Finance, Failed Politics, and the Global Crisis of American Capitalism, 2008, etc.) makes the persuasive case—as Jefferson insisted long ago—that a de facto independence existed well before the Declaration of Independence. It wasn’t merely a matter of military skirmishes, raids, expeditions and battles that bloodied the year, but also of campaigns opened on other, critical fronts: the ousting of numerous royal governors and lesser officials from office; the takeover of local militias and the establishment of committees, associations and congresses to take up the business of self-government; the desperate scramble for gunpowder and munitions to prosecute the war; and the courting of European powers happy to see Britain weakened. In all these fights during 1775, the colonists made crucial advances, both material and psychological, from which the plodding British never quite recovered. Highlighting, especially, developments in the “vanguard” colonies of Virginia, Massachusetts, Connecticut and South Carolina, where the concentration of wealth, population and leadership accounted for an outsized influence, Phillips explores the ethnic, religious, demographic, political and economic roots of the revolution. He examines the differing class interests (including those of slaves and Native Americans), regional preoccupations and various ideologies, sometimes clashing, sometimes aligning, that contributed to the revolutionary fervor and reminds us how much sorting out was necessary to prepare the national mind for the new order that the Declaration merely ratified. Casual readers may find Phillips’ treatment a bit daunting, but serious history students will revel in the overwhelming detail he marshals to make his convincing argument.

Impressively authoritative.