IF IT'S SNOWY AND YOU KNOW IT, CLAP YOUR PAWS! by Kim Norman

IF IT'S SNOWY AND YOU KNOW IT, CLAP YOUR PAWS!

by ; illustrated by
Age Range: 3 - 6
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KIRKUS REVIEW

A wintry riff on the popular participation song, with a cast of appropriate cold-climate animals.

A rabbit in sunglasses slides down a snowy hill, using a polar bear pal as a sled. Penguin, walrus, fox and others look on approvingly. The text faithfully follows the rhythms of the song as these characters frolic. “If your fur is full of flurries, taste a flake” shows the walrus making snow angels while the wolf and bighorn sheep skate neat figure eights around him. “If it’s shimmery and sunny, sculpt a friend” features almost all the animals making snow animals. (The moose is sunning in a chair with a reflector.) They also build a fort, blow a kiss, give a roar and share a meal (“If it’s starry and you’re starving...”). Everyone shares a cave at the end of the day: “If it’s sleeting and you’re sleepy, climb in bed.” It’s like a big pajama party. In their sleep, all dream of more exciting fun they can have tomorrow. Norman’s solid variations on the preschool song are completely singer-friendly, supported by Woodruff’s crisply drawn, smiling animals, in watercolor, colored pencil and pastel.

Consistently entertaining and engaging. All together now! (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 2013
ISBN: 978-1-4549-0384-0
Page count: 24pp
Publisher: Sterling
Review Posted Online:
Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15th, 2013




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