MURDER IN ROSSLARE by Kin Platt

MURDER IN ROSSLARE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An unpretentious, untidy but readable tale set in Rosslare, Ireland, where newly widowed Bill Stanwood, retired from Los Angeles Homicide, has gone to find his dead wife's sister Noreen, long out of touch. Find her he does, working in the hotel where he's staying, but then she's found murdered on the local golf links before he's done much more than introduce himself. Stanwood gets little help from local police as he tries to find the killer. He soon discovers that Noreen liked a dangerous life, spent little time in Rosslare, was involved in a semi-terrorist group, had an affair with married George Hanna, a terrible golfer from Galway, succeeded by wanted IRA man Terry Dugan, who meant to marry her. Stanwood perseveres, putting aside the attraction he feels for hotel guest Mary Garner, a beautiful Welsh teacher. He meets Noreen's weird mother and bullying stepfather, Matt Bogson, and finds another murder victim--artist Donald Zale, who lived in one of Bogson's rented mobile homes. The case Stanwood finally builds is pretty rickety, undermined by motivation that seems feeble and unconvincing, but a series of intriguing Irish eccentrics and the cheerful lilt of the author's writing style save the day and his modestly entertaining story.

Pub Date: March 31st, 1986
Publisher: Walker