THE FLUTE OF TRUTH by KrsnaKnows

THE FLUTE OF TRUTH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An Indian Master reveals his insights into following the spiritual path.

This book, a compilation of Indian Master KrsnaKnows' teachings by his students, addresses various aspects of spiritual practice. KrsnaKnows offers a unique perspective as a thoroughly tech-smart, postmodern Indian who still has many traditional views. In the Hindu tradition, the deity Krishna, whose appearances include a flute-playing cowherd, traditionally ushers in humanity’s final era of dissolution, the Kaliyuga (the Iron Age)—which the author identifies as the present day. This prophetic warning gives an apocalyptic edge to KrsnaKnows’ examination of contemporary spiritual practice. The book dismisses meditation and yoga as possibly false paths; instead, it advocates following a spiritual teacher, or guru, to attain spiritual mastery. The author gathers his posts into nine chapters that give his material a loose organization. Overall, the discussion often revolves around issues that will be of particular significance to Indian readers. KrsnaKnows takes on the idea of forced marriage, for example, and the belief that destiny controls one’s fate: “Fight and don’t give up,” he writes. “Screw destiny!” He admonishes spiritual seekers not to accept outward appearances but to delve into deeper truths that reveal spiritual dimensions. He also attempts to clarify the concept of karma, which he intriguingly compares to Isaac Newton’s third law of motion—for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction—and rails against those who pray for money or success in life. Overall, the book is written for an audience that already understands the Hindu pantheon and is familiar with Indian English dialect and idiom. Syntactical confusion, however, often besets his prose: “Most people come with baggage which reeks of denial,” the author passionately proclaims about those new to the spiritual path (and their evidently foul-smelling luggage). Other errors, meanwhile, frequently detract from the power of the author’s observations: Pampering pets, for example, raises the author’s “heckles.”

A wide-ranging collection of blog posts by an Indian cyberguru that’s hampered by syntactical uncertainties and double-entendres.

Pub Date: May 30th, 2014
ISBN: 978-1482823479
Page count: 302pp
Publisher: PartridgeSingapore
Program: Kirkus Indie
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