CRUSADER WITHOUT VIOLENCE: Martin Luther King, Jr. by L. D. Reddick

CRUSADER WITHOUT VIOLENCE: Martin Luther King, Jr.

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The bus boycott by the Negroes of Montgomery, Alabama, in 1956 brought to world-wide attention a Negro Baptist minister little known before. Unimposing in stature and soft-spoken by nature, he assumed the leadership of his people in their struggle in such a way as to demonstrate that the new Southern Negro ""has replaced self-pity with self-respect,--and self-depreciation with dignity"". Mr. Lawrence D. Reddick has here given us the story of this man, indicating the ingredients of life and the elements of the situation in which he found himself which added up to making King a crusader without violence. He has produced a good reportorial job which makes available a great deal of information about King and his cause not available elsewhere. It is too early to print a profound interpretation of the meaning of this life so early thrust into prominence, but such material as this is indispensable for the later task. Many general readers will be attracted to this book.

Pub Date: May 27th, 1959
Publisher: Harper