THE MAN THAT YOU MARRY by

THE MAN THAT YOU MARRY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There is nothing new here, and, certainly nothing to shock. Perhaps both the best and the worst that can be said of the book is that it carries the approach, the tone and the conviction of the ladies' magazine ventures into psychology and orality. There is a heavy reliance on the illustrative case that fits the point to be illustrated with all the solemn snugness of a ""can this marriage survive"" type of case analysis. The didactic Dr. Peck, whose audience is more likely to be post enopause rather than mid-adolescent, is quoted repeatedly as are the various clergy who have made pronouncements on the married state. In the portions of advice on household finance, organization and family responsibility, the advice is common-ensical-- at least no young wife would disagree. Masculinity and femininity, and their roles in our society are presented with a patness that can hardly be thought of as comforting to the more insecure who are often driven to books for their answers. The secure won't need the book. It is a reinforcement of all of the ideas that custom, tradition, and our society have held dear. However, it is a disappointing book in terms of realistic counselling.

Pub Date: April 29th, 1963
Publisher: Macrae Smith