Well-organized and edited, this intriguing volume should serve as an excellent resource to those thoroughly interested in...

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RUSSIANS ON TRUMP

PRESS COVERAGE AND COMMENTARY

A collection of articles and editorials from the Russian press focuses on President Donald Trump.

Given the flood of coverage in America concerning Trump’s connections to Russia, that country’s effect on the 2016 election, and U.S.–Russian relations under the new administration, debut editor Bogoslaw does a great service in providing a compilation of Russian pieces concerning the leader and his presidency. The well-structured book goes far toward addressing the often myopic view of U.S. readers by challenging the American public to see Trump from an international perspective. The editor begins with selections regarding Trump as a businessman and entertainment figure from the days before his foray into politics. The work then moves on to coverage of the Trump campaign. These pieces, though differing in opinions, point to the wide support that he had in Russia as he campaigned against Hillary Clinton. “It is sad,” notes one article, but a recent “Gallup poll clearly shows that Trump and his American admirers have now become a mirror image of today’s Russian mass consciousness.” The book moves on to coverage of Trump’s election victory, asking “How did this happen?” and “What next?” Moving forward, the volume presents pieces regarding the administration’s “Russia ties” and his first months in office from the perspective of foreign policy. Bogoslaw points out a number of captivating aspects of Russian coverage as the work moves along, such as this insight: “Even when Russian commentators are most confused, disappointed and even outraged by Trump’s decisions, they do not impugn his character, honesty or intelligence—unlike their counterparts in the West, particularly in the US.” Editorial comments also clarify a number of finer points for American readers, such as an explanation of “yarky,” an adjective Vladimir Putin once use to describe Trump. While the U.S. press largely translated the term as “brilliant,” it is explained that the word more properly means “colorful.” Opinions of the writers quoted range from excitedly pro-Trump to vehemently anti-Trump and almost every shade in between.

Well-organized and edited, this intriguing volume should serve as an excellent resource to those thoroughly interested in Trump’s position on the world stage.

Pub Date: May 7, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-879944-89-3

Page Count: 402

Publisher: East View Press

Review Posted Online: June 21, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2018

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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