GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER by Lawrence Elliott

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Lawrence Elliott's biography of the great Negro scientist whose discoveries ""freed the South from the tyranny of King Cotton"" is openly inspirational, honestly so, in that it holds for the most part to fact with a minimum of fictionalizing of Carver's own thoughts. The more sophisticated reader will feel the externalized life lacks a consideration of inner dynamics, but Carver's own history, from the days when he was known as Carver's George, when ""Aunt Susan"" Moses reared him, to his recognition after his pioneering work on the peanut at Tuskegee as ""the least imposing celebrity the world has ever known"" (Ralph Bunche), has an epic simplicity. As a baby he had struggled to survive, as a boy he struggled to achieve (to learn), as a man he strived to serve by imparting his knowledge. The Clare Booth Luce quote heading the final chapter of the book gives an indication of its direction and of the market for which it is written: ""It is significant that because his birthday is unknown, we honor his death-day...the day all saints are honored."" A reasonably responsible but in no way outstanding addition to the Negro heritage.

Pub Date: Oct. 5th, 1966
Publisher: Prentice-Hall