SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE CASE OF SABINA HALL by L.B. Greenwood

SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE CASE OF SABINA HALL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Though much less impressive than Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Raleigh Legacy, this second Baker Street pastiche is again faithful yet unpedantic, atmospheric yet crisp--with only a few touches (sexual subject-matter, tastefully treated) that Conan Doyle's Watson would never have allowed himself. As a favor to a university-chum, Holmes and Watson set off for bleak, isolated Sabina Hall on the Bristol coast--where tight-fisted old coal merchant Silas Andrews, probably dying, is in need of a live-in doctor. But just moments before our heroes' arrival, Silas expires. Of natural causes? Holmes thinks not, noticing a strange smell--indicative of poison--on a medicine spoon. And the wretched, virtually unheated manse positively teems with suspects: Silas' long-suffering sister-in-law/housekeeper Bertha Garth, who now gloats nastily about her huge inheritance; servant-relatives Joel and Belle Harper, who expected (erroneously) a legacy; Cockney housemaid Sally Kipp, a recent arrival (with secret motives) from London; ancient villager/handyman Neb, who wants vengeance for Silas' bygone mistreatment of coal-miners; and even sweet poor-relation Agnes Meredith, Aunt Garth's put-upon companion. Without the charm or rich plotting of Greenwood's debut, slightly talky and rather thinly predictable--but sturdy diversion for gothically inclined Holmes fans.

Pub Date: June 1st, 1988
Publisher: Simon & Schuster