THE HOPSCOTCH TREE by Leda Siskind

THE HOPSCOTCH TREE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Fifth-grader Edith Gold finds that the hardest part of adjusting to her new school is withstanding the torments of anti-Semitic Zandra Kott and her gang; but Edith finds solace in whispering her troubles to the immense ""Hopscotch Tree"" on the playground. Whether the tree truly answers her or simply because she uses her own good sense and talent, she also conceives of a way to confront Zandra publicly by adding a verse with a pointed message to the Chanukah song she's performing as a solo at the school ""Christmas"" concert. Edith's narrative is filled with keenly remembered details of the feelings of a girl at the brink of adolescence, and her solutions are naturally arrived at and believable. There is, however, one false note: Edith's constant references to her parents' arguments and hostile silences as ""Uh-Oh"": ""Uh-Oh lasted the rest of the night,"" or ""the Uh-Oh was so heavy I was going to get trapped and crushed by it""--a cutesy shorthand that seems gratingly out of character for the otherwise articulate Edith.

Pub Date: Nov. 1st, 1992
Page count: 122pp
Publisher: Bantam