HEAD OVER WHEELS by Lee Kingman

HEAD OVER WHEELS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

What happens to the Tredinnick family when Terry, twin brother of Kerry, is paralyzed by an accident. Terry is, of course, both angry and depressed and he resents the ""pet-freak"" treatment of certain friends and relatives, yet he does work hard in Rehab and return home with some regained skills. Kingman concentrates not on his adjustment or even the dreary complications of his condition (spasms, vomiting) but on the family scene: how brother Kerry feels guilt and a strain in their relationship; how the parents, oppressed by bills, take on additional jobs; how the younger children feel put upon and neglected. And she uses others, especially three teenage girls, to dramatize the reactions of outsiders. Ultimately, Terry and Kerry open up enough to admit the loss--they're no longer identical--and to recognize how different their futures must be. An even-handed, somewhat deliberate exploration in which the whole bunch is almost squeaky-clean.

Pub Date: Oct. 25th, 1979
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin